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Immunisation Schedule

Immunisation means making an individual immune towards a potential disease or infection. Immunisation is the best preventive care and can be done by administering vaccines, however, some vaccines are not a one time process and need to be given at scheduled intervals.

Approximately 25% of global mortality in children younger than 6 years is due to lack of immunity towards infectious diseases. Proper vaccination as per recommended schedules can greatly improve the condition and safeguard children from life threatening diseases and infections. There are several diseases for which a child is vaccinated during the first six years.

Birth 1 month 2 months 3 months 4 months 5 months 6 months
BCG
Scheduled only once
Given within 15 days of child birth
Children infected with HIV should not be given this vaccine
Hepatitis B
Scheduled Thrice
Given at birth, then between 1st and 2nd month and between 6 months to 18 months consecutively.
Polio
Scheduled Five times
Two type of vaccination OPV(oral polio vaccination) and IPV(injected polio vaccination)
OPV zero is given at child birth
Next 4 booster or follow-ups at 6th week, 10th week, between 15th to 18th month and last dose between 5th and 6th year can be OPV or IPV as per choice or according to doctors recommendation
DTP
Recommended schedule 5 times
Prevents Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, It should not be given in case of any kind of allergic reactions
The first DTP vaccine is given at 2nd month followed by vaccinations during the 4th, 6th, between 15th to 18th month and then during 4 to 6 years of age.
HIB
Scheduled four times
Prevents – Haemophilus influenzae type B
Vaccine schedules at 2nd month followed by 4th, 6th and then between the 12th to 15th month of child birth.
Pneumococcal
Scheduled 4 times
Prevents diseases caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus)
PCV schedules at 2nd month followed by 4th, 6th and then between the 12th to 18th month of child birth.
Rotavirus RV
Scheduled thrice
All the scheduled dosages must be given before 8 months after child birth, ideally starting with first during the 2nd month followed by 2nd and 3rd dosages during the 4th and 6th months consecutively.
MMR
Scheduled twice
Prevents measles, mumps and rubella
First dose given between the 12th to 15th months of child birth. Followup dose is administered between 4 to 6 years of age.
Varicella
Scheduled twice
Protects the child from chikenpox (Varicella)
First dose given between the 12th to 15th months of child birth. Followup dose is administered between 4 to 6 years of age.
Hepatatis A
Scheduled twice
prevents infections caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV)
Given twice with a gap of six months in between. First dose is given during the 12th month second between 18th to 24th month.

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